Skeet Facilities:  The club has seven Shotgun Ranges for shooting. Fields three through six are used for skeet with fields four five and six lighted.

Public Use:  Skeet Field #6 is open to the public during Club Hours.  Shooting Instructors are available for lessons.

What is Skeet? 

In Skeet, targets cross in front of you, and always follow the same path .

Skeet Field

Skeet Field

The skeet field is arranged with two separate target throwing houses, one high (where the target exits the house at a height of approx. 10 feet above ground level), and one low house (where the target exits the house at a height of approx. 3 feet above ground level). The target path is set, and the birds will always follow the same path of flight.

There are 8 separate shooting positions (referred to as “stations”), with 7 arranged in a semi-circle with a radius of 21 yards, measured the point where the targets cross to the various stations.

A “round” is fired with a squad of up to 5 shooters, all starting at station 1, and then all progressing across to the different stations as a group.

A full round of skeet consists of 25 targets, with one shot fired at each target.

  • Station 1 – One high house bird, one low house bird, and one pair of doubles is shot.
  • Station 2 – Repeat the sequence. High, low, double. (On doubles, the high house bird is fired at first.)
  • Station 3: one high; one low.
  • Station 4: one high, one low.
  • Station 5: one high; one low.
  • Station 6: high, low, double. (On doubles, the low house bird is fired at first.)
  • Station 7: high, low, double. (On doubles, the low house bird is fired at first.)
  • Station 8: high, low.

The first bird missed by a shooter is immediately repeated, and this is called the “option.” If a shooter hits the first 24 birds without missing, the option becomes the last bird fired (station 8, low), which is repeated.

Formal competition is based on shotgun gauge, and 12, 20, 28, and .410 bore shotguns are all used.

Skeet requires an open choke gun, such as “Cylinder,” “Skeet”, or “Improved Cylinder”. Use of a tighter choke makes this game EXTREMELY difficult!

Typical shot sizes used are #9, and #8. Note that shot sizes LARGER than 7-1/2 are prohibited at trap and skeet courses. This is because the larger shot sizes retain too much energy during flight, and un-necessarily extend the hazardous “shot fall zone”.